Oggi:

2018-08-18 18:01

Natural Hazards and Nuclear Power Plants in Europe

di: 
Leonello Serva

The stress test analysis of European NPPs was carried out using values of these hazards evaluated prior to the catastrophic Fukushima-Daichi accident. The aim of this short article is simply to comment on this important aspect.

La versione in italiano dell'articolo è riportata più sotto

The figure below (Fig. 1) shows the location of the NPP (nuclear power plant) sites in Europe.

Fig. 1. NPP sites in Europe (blue dots). Source: http://maptd.com/worldwide-map-of-nuclear-power-stations-and-earthquake-zones/

The map has not been updated and indicates plants that, like the Italian ones, have been closed down. In Europe, a majority of sites/plants (selected decades ago) lies inland along rivers. A significant number, however, are coastal, mainly on the North Sea.

Of all natural hazards potentially affecting these European sites, only earthquakes, tsunamis (for the coastal sites) and volcanoes (that is, some sites localized near volcanic centers displaying recent Holocenic activity) are dealt with in this article.

In view of the nature of this article, the main conclusions for the three hazards considered are presented. Naturally, the author stands ready to respond to any comment on these conclusions. In addition, the relationship between the potential size of these hazards and the stress test analysis performed on these sites after the Fukushima-Daichi accident is given.

 

Earthquakes
As far as earthquakes are concerned, it is common knowledge and a common sentiment that seismic hazard is more or less high in all European mountain chains (Betides, Pyrenees, Apennines, Alps, Carpathians, Betides, Pyrenees, Dynarides and Taurides), while is far less high in the rest of the territory, i.e., the stable continental crust of Europe.

This is certainly true in terms of number of seismic events over a time interval as the historical period, and therefore also in terms of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment, but the same cannot be said of the maximum potential earthquake for each area. Indeed, significant seismic events such as those affecting the New Madrid area in the US can also occur within stable continental crustal areas (Fig. 2). As seen from this figure and even better Fig. 3, geological conditions potentially similar to those prevailing in the areas surrounding the 1812 New Madrid (M = 7.7, 7.5 and 7.7) and Charleston 1886 (M = 7.3) events are present in the offshore and onshore European territory; in addition, potential effects of the glacial rebound should  be also considered in terms of seismogenesis in its northern part .

To assess with reasonable confidence the maximum potential earthquakes that can affect these European sites located in the stable continental crust, detailed studies need therefore to be conducted, as recommended in the IAEA Safety Standards SSG-9 (2010), Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations, where four scales (Regional type, no less than 300 km around the site; Near regional type, no less than 25 km around the site; Site vicinity type, no less than 5 Km around the site;  and Site type, 1 km around the site) of geological, geophysical and seismological investigations are recommended.

It is important to emphasize that only after these type of studies it is possible to be sure about the potential earthquake that can affect each site and, therefore, if the design level for the performed stress test analysis is adequately conservative.

In terms of earthquake hazard, it is also important to be sure that none of these sites is located on a potentially capable fault. To resolve this issue, the same IAEA Safety Standards SSG-9 must be applied. The  conclusion indicated above is therefore applicable for this phenomenon also.

 

Tsunamis
Tsunami hazard is historically well recognized in the Mediterranean sea, although studies on the maximum potential tsunami are lacking. In particular, in this inner sea, tsunamis can be generated by:

- Strong offshore earthquakes, e.g. in subduction zones such as the Calabrian, the Aegean and the Cyprus arcs.

- Coastal and offshore volcanoes. In particular, tsunamis can be generated by submarine volcanic explosions and/or by the collapse of their entire edificie or significant part of their flanks.

Regarding the Atlantic Ocean, only a significant tsunami, generated by the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, is recorded in historical times; and calculation have been performed on the potential tsunami on the North Sea coast triggered by some huge ice collapse in the Greenland and the Artic Ocean. However, taking into account the level of knowledge that we have on the tectonics of this ocean, we cannot rule out the potential presence of seismogenic (tsunamigenic) structures in this vast oceanic domain. For example, our current knowledge on the seismic potential of structures located in the dark grey areas of Fig. 2 and light blue areas of Fig. 3 is unquestionably poor, and earthquakes with magnitudes comparable to the afore-mentioned 1886 Charleston event cannot be ruled out a priori.

Furthermore, the physiographic features of the Atlantic ocean (Fig. 2) clearly show evidence of volcanoes where large eruptions and large flank or caldera collapse cannot be excluded.

In view of what stated above, it is possible to conclude that the potential for significant tsunamis generated in different areas of this ocean and due to tectonics and volcanism does actually exist.

It is important to emphasize also that the geological record (paleotsunamites) is very incomplete at present concerning the Atlantic coast, and the same can be said for most of the Mediterranean coast.

For the these reasons, IAEA SSG-9 (2010) and IAEA SSG-18 (2011), Meteorological and Hydrological Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations, should be applied for all sites currently in operation in order to know with certainty their level of risk. In conclusion, the conclusion stated above about the stress test and earthquake hazard also holds true for the tsunami hazard.

Fig. 2. This figure shows the strongest earthquakes that occurred in the last centuries in so-called “intraplate” areas. The “intraplate” zone (dark grey and red areas) has been divided in two sectors on the basis of crustal characteristics. The grey dark can be referred to as the Extended Continental Crust and defines domains that experienced post-Mesozoic tectonic deformation but are no longer active. Red indicates purely continental crust (cratonic areas). From EPRI 1994, modified. The earthquakes of stable continental regions. Vol. 1, Assessment of large earthquake potential. TR-102261-V1; Research Projects 2556-12, 2356-56, 2356-59.


Fig. 3. Crustal intraplate seismicity (solid circles related to Mw = 4.5 (the smallest ones), Mw = 5.6, Mw, 6.7 and Mw > 7.0) plotted on a global map of S-wave velocity variations in the mantle, δVS, at a depth of 175 km. Earthquakes outside stable continental regions (SCRs) have been excluded. Orange and red regions show negative δVS anomalies and correspond to regions where lithospheric thicknesses are less than 175 km. Blue regions show positive δVS anomalies and correspond to regions with a lithosphere thicker than 175 km. Blue regions, corresponding to δVS anomalies greater than 2%, are restricted to the continents, and dark blue regions with δVS anomalies >3% correspond to stable Precambrian cratons underlain by thick lithospheric roots. Few crustal earthquakes occur within the seismically-defined cratons; however, many earthquakes are located in the regions surrounding these cratons.
Walter D. Mooney, Jeroen Ritsema, Yong Keun Hwang, Crustal seismicity and the earthquake catalog maximum moment magnitude (Mcmax) in stable continental regions (SCRs): Correlation with the seismic velocity of the lithosphere, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volumes 357–358, 1 December 2012, Pages 78-83, ISSN 0012-821X, 10.1016/j.epsl.2012.08.032.

 

Volcanoes
Regarding volcanism, only at the end of last year was the Safety Standards IAEA SSG-21 (Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation of Nuclear Installations) issued. As clearly stated in this guide, a volcanic hazard assessment must be performed for all sites that could potentially be affected by the volcanic phenomena listed in this document (Table 1).

Table 1. Volcanic phenomena and associated characteristics that could affect nuclear installations, with implications for site selection and site evaluation and design (modified from IAEA SSG-21(2012), Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation of Nuclear Installations).

 

Phenomena

Potentially adverse characteristics for nuclear installations

 

Considered an exclusion condition at site selection stage?

 

Can effects be mitigated by measures for design and operation?

 

1. Tephra fallout

Static physical loads, abrasive and corrosive particles in air and water

No

Yes

2. Pyroclastic density currents: pyroclastic flows, surges and blasts

Dynamic physical loads, atmospheric overpressures, projectile impacts, temperatures >300°C, abrasive particles, toxic gases

Yes

No

3. Lava flows

Dynamic physical loads, floods and water impoundments, temperatures >700°C

Yes

No

4. Debris avalanches, landslides and slope failures

Dynamic physical loads, atmospheric overpressures, projectile impacts, water impoundments and floods

Yes

No

5. Volcanic debris flows, lahars and floods

Dynamic physical loads, water impoundments and floods, suspended particulates in water

Yes

Yes

6. Opening of new vents

Dynamic physical loads, ground deformation, volcanic earthquakes

Yes

No

7. Volcano generated missiles

Particle impacts, static physical loads, abrasive particles in water

Yes

Yes

8. Volcanic gases and aerosols

Toxic and corrosive gases, acid rain, gas charged lakes, water contamination

No

Yes

9. Tsunamis, seiches, crater lake failure and glacial burst

Water inundation

Yes

Yes

10. Atmospheric phenomena

Dynamic overpressures, lightning strikes, downburst winds

No

Yes

11. Ground deformation

Ground displacements, subsidence or uplift, tilting, landslides

Yes

No

12. Volcanic earthquakes and related hazards

Continuous tremor, multiple shocks, usually earthquake magnitude M < 5

No

Yes

13. Hydrothermal systems and groundwater anomalies

 

Thermal water, corrosive water, water contamination, inundation or upwelling, hydrothermal alteration, landslides, modification of karst and thermokarst, abrupt change in hydraulic pressure

Yes

Yes

 

Figure 4 shows the age of volcanic phenomena in areas where many NPPs are located, and for these sites at least, the guide should be applied. More generally, this guide should be applied to all sites that can be included in the IAEA SSG-21 requirements, as shown in Fig. 5.

Fig. 4. Map showing the presence of volcanic activity during the Holocene (yellow triangles) in Spain, France and Germany. It is clearly seen that NPP sites are located close to these volcanic manifestations.

Fig. 5. The methodological approach to volcanic hazard assessment (modified from IAEA SSG-21(2012), Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation of Nuclear Installations).

 

Conclusions
As stated in the introduction, only the main conclusions regarding each of the considered hazards have been given in this short article. The stress test analysis of European NPPs was carried out using values of these hazards evaluated prior to the catastrophic Fukushima-Daichi accident. Significant changes in evaluation methods have been derived from this accident, and these methods are well described in the IAEA Safety Standards document cited above. The aim of this short article is therefore simply to comment on this important aspect. The use of these standards is also important in order to assure homogeneity in the evaluation of all the European sites and this is not a minor aspect in the light of an actual European Union.


 

Rischi Naturali e Centrali Nucleari in Europa
di Leonello Serva

Gli stress test degli impianti europei sono stati espletati sulla base dei valori di progetto di questi impianti  calcolati prima dell’incidente catastrofico di Fukushima. Scopo di questo articolo è solo sottolineare questo aspetto. 

 

La figura sottostante (Fig. 1) mostra I siti europei ospitanti centrali elettronucleari.

Fig. 1. Siti delle centrali elettronucleari europee (NPP), evidenziati con i cerchi blu. Ripreso da: http://maptd.com/worldwide-map-of-nuclear-power-stations-and-earthquake-zones/

La mappa, non aggiornata come si evince dal fatto che riporta anche i siti italiani chiusi da tempo, mostra che la maggior parte dei siti nucleari europei  (scelti molte decine di anni orsono) sono localizzati lungo fiumi importanti; non mancano però siti costieri, per la maggior parte sul Mare del Nord.

Tra tutti I fenomeni naturali che possono creare situazioni di rischio in questi siti, in questo articolo sono trattati soltanto i  terremoti, i maremoti  ed i vulcani; e a tale scopo vengono fornite fondamentalmente soltanto affermazioni conclusive, restando, però, disponibilissimi a fornire ogni elemento a loro  supporto. Viene altresì fornita l’interazione tra la potenziale entità di questi rischi e gli   stress test espletati su questi impianti a seguito dell’incidente nella centrale nucleare di  Fukushima Daichi.

 

Terremoti
Per il rischio sismico, è conoscenza/percezione comune che esso sia più o meno alto lungo le catene montuose europee (Betidi, Pirenei, Appennini, Alpi, Carpazi, Dinaridi, Tauridi) mentre è basso nel resto del territorio europeo definito come crosta continentale stabile.

Questo è certamente vero in termini di numero di terremoti che in tali zone si verificano entro un determinate lasso di tempo e quindi in termini di  probabilità; lo stesso però non può essere affermato in termini di massimo terremoto potenziale di queste zone. Basti solo ricordare che considerando il periodo storico, è significativo il numero di forti terremoti che nel mondo si sono verificati  anche nelle zone definite come crosta continentale stabile (ad esempio, i terremoti nell’Est nord-americano come quelli di New Madrid (M = 7.7, 7.5 and 7.7) e di Charleston (M = 7.3, Fig. 2). Come è chiaramente visibile da questa figura, ma ancora meglio dalla figura 3, condizioni geologiche potenzialmente simili a quelle che hanno generato i terremoti suddetti sono presenti anche nel territorio europeo sia in mare che in terraferma, ed inoltre non è da escludere che nella sua parte settentrionale possano essere ancora presenti stress tettonici legati al rimbalzo isostatico che segue i periodi glaciali quale quello conclusosi circa 15.000 anni orsono.

Per poter valutare il massimo terremoto potenziale nei siti ubicati nella crosta continentale stabile europea è pertanto necessario svolgere studi molto accurati quali quelli raccomandati dalla guida tecnica della IAEA SSG-9 (Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations), dove 4 scale di analisi a diverso dettaglio (scala) e qualità  (Regional, per non meno di 300 km intorno al sito; Near regional, per non meno di 25 km intorno al sito; Site vicinity, per non meno di 5 km intorno al sito; e Site per 1 km di raggio intorno al sito) sono raccomandate per quanto riguarda la geologia/geofisica e la sismologia.

E’ opportuno pertanto sottolineare in questa sede che, solo a valle degli studi raccomandati da questa Guida Tecnica, risulterà possibile concludere che il terremoto di progetto utilizzato per gli stress test  di questi impianti sia adeguatamente conservativo.

Rimanendo in tema di rischio sismico, non bisogna dimenticare il problema della fagliazione superficiale (dislocazione e/o deformazione della superficie causata dal movimento della faglia il cui movimento in profondità ha prodotto il terremoto). Anche per la soluzione di questo tipo di rischio, è necessario utilizzare le indagini raccomandate dalla suddetta Guida Tecnica IAEA.

 

Maremoti
Per quanto riguarda il Mediterraneo, il rischio maremoto, come bene ci mostra la sua storia, può provenire sia dai terremoti che si possono produrre nelle aree di subduzione presenti nel suo interno (Archi Calabro, Ellenico e Cipriota) che da fenomeni vulcanici generati sia da vulcani ubicati in mare (sottomarini ed emersi) che da fenomeni  vulcanici costieri; ad esempio, grandi eruzioni di tipo esplosivo anche comportanti il collasso dell’intero edificio vulcanico e/o collassi dei loro fianchi.

Per l’Oceano Atlantico, storicamente è soprattutto ricordato il maremoto originato dal cosiddetto terremoto di Lisbona del 1755. Calcoli sono stati fatti anche sul maremoto potenziale derivante da collassi di ghiaccio dalla Groelandia e nell’Oceano Artico. Ad ogni modo, si ritiene importante sottolineare che, considerando il basso livello di conoscenza disponibile sulla tettonica di questo oceano, non è possibile escludere a priori che altre sorgenti sismogeniche/tsunamigeniche, quali quella che ha generato il terremoto di Lisbona,  non siano presenti al suo interno. Quanto detto sopra circa le aree in grigio scuro della Fig. 2 e quelle celesti della Fig. 3 ne sono  la riprova.

Non possiamo poi dimenticare la cosiddetta dorsale-medio atlantica che corre per tutta la sua lunghezza e di cui l’Islanda ne rappresenta una piccola parte emersa. Questa dorsale è costituita da vulcani attivi nei quali una eruzione esplosiva di grandi dimensione, sulla base delle scarse conoscenze disponibili, non può essere esclusa a priori come anche il collasso di una parte significativa di uno di essi (un intero versante oppure l’intera caldera).

E’ importante sottolineare qui che purtroppo studi inerenti tracce geologiche di eventuali maremoti passati (le cosiddette paleotsunamiti) lungo le coste europee atlantica e mediterranea sono ancora numericamente molto carenti .

Anche in questo caso, quindi sarebbe utile applicare ai siti costieri europei la guida IAEA SSG-9 sopra citata e la IAEA SSG-18 (Meteorological and Hidrological Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installation). In conclusione, quanto scritto sugli stress test per il terremoto rimane valido anche per il maremoto.

Fig. 2. La figura mostra i terremoti più forti che si sono verificati negli ultimi secoli nelle cosiddette aree “interplacca”. Le zone “interplacca” (in grigio scuro e in rosso) sono state divise in due settori sulla base delle caratteristiche della crosta. IL colore grigio scuro si riferisce alla crosta continentale estesa e definisce domini  che hanno subito la deformazione tettonica post-Mesozoica ma non sono attualmente più attivi. Il colore rosso indica la zona tipicamente continentale (aree cratoniche). Ripreso da EPRI 1994, modificato. The earthquakes of stable continental regions. Vol. 1, Assessment of large earthquake potential. TR-102261-V1; Research Projects 2556-12, 2356-56, 2356-59.


Fig. 3. Sismicità costale intraplacca (i cerchi pieni riguardano Mw=4,5 per i cerchi più piccoli Mw=5,6, Mw=6,7 e Mw>7,0) indicati su una mappa globale delle variazioni di velocità di onde s-wave nel matello, δVS, alla profondità di 175 km. I terremoti al di fuori delle regioni continentali stabili sono (SCRs) sono stati esclusi. Le regioni in arancione e rosso mostrano anomalie negative del δVS e corrispondono alle regioni dove lo spessore della litosfera è minore di 175 km. Le regioni in blu, corrispondenti ad anomalie del δVS più grandi del 2%, sono limitate ai continenti, mentre le regioni blu scuro con anomalie del δVS maggiori del 3% corrispondono a cratoni stabili Precambriani sovrastanti radici litosferiche spesse. Rari terremoti crostali avvengono all’interno di cratoni definiti sismicamente; comunque, molti terremoti sono localizzati in regioni localizzate all’intorno di questi cratoni. Ripreso da Walter D. Mooney, Jeroen Ritsema, Yong Keun Hwang, Crustal seismicity and the earthquake catalog maximum moment magnitude (Mcmax) in stable continental regions (SCRs): Correlation with the seismic velocity of the lithosphere, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volumes 357–358, 1 December 2012, Pages 78-83, ISSN 0012-821X, 10.1016/j.epsl.2012.08.032.

 

Vulcani
In merito al vulcanesimo ed al rischio connesso, nel 2011 è stata pubblicata la Guida Tecnica della IAEA SSG-21 (Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation of Nuclear Installations). In questo documento è chiaramente espresso che tutti i siti che possono essere interessati da un fenomeno vulcanico di quelli elencati nella tabella 1 debbano essere valutato in termini di rischio vulcanico.

Tabella 1. Fenomeni vulcanici e caratteristiche associate che potrebbero avere effetto sulle installazioni nucleari con implicazioni per la selezione del sito e per la valutazione e progetto del sito (ripreso da IAEA SSG-21(2012), Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation of Nuclear Installations).

 

Fenomeni

Caratteristiche potenzialmente avverse per installazioni nucleari

Viene considerata una condizione di esclusione allo stadio di selezione del sito?

Sono possibili effetti di mitigazione per mezzo di misure su disegno e sulle condizioni operative?

1. Tephra fallout

Carichi fisici stabili statici, particelle abrasive corrosive nell’aria e nell’acqua

no

si

2. Correnti di densità piroclastica: flussi piroclastici, surges e esplosioni

Carichi fisici dinamici, sovrappressioni atmosferiche, impatti di proiettili, temperature maggiori di 300 centigradi, particelle abrasive, gas tossici

si

no

3. Flussi di lava

Carichi fisici dinamici, fenomeni alluvionali e di eccesso di acqua, temperatura maggiore di 700 centigradi,

si

no

4. Materiale di valanghe, frane e frane di pendio

Carichi fisici dinamici, sovrapposizioni atmosferiche, impatti di proiettili, alluvioni e eccessi d’acque

si

no

5. Flusso di detriti vulcanici, lahars e alluvioni

Carichi fisici dinamici, alluvioni e eccessi d’acqua, particolato sospeso in acqua

si

si

6. Apertura di nuove bocche

Carichi fisici dinamici, deformazione del suolo, terremoti vulcanici

si

no

7. Missili generati da vulcani

Impatti di particelle, carichi fisici statici particelle abrasive in acqua

si

si

8. Gas vulcanici e areosol

Gas tossici e corrosivi, pioggia acida, laghi caricati di gas, contaminazione dell’acqua

no

Si,

9. Tsunami , spighe, rottura di laghi craterici ed esplosioni glaciali

Inondazioni di acqua

si

si

10. Fenomeni atmosferici

Sovrapposizioni dinamiche, scarichi di fulmini, venti provenienti dall’esplosione

no

si

11. Deformazione del terreno

Movimenti del terreno, subsidenza o sollevamento, piegamento del terreno, frane

si

no

12. Terremoti vulcanici e rischi collegati

Terremoti continui, shocks multipli , in genere terremoti di magnitudo M<5

no

si

13. Sistemi idrotermali e anomalie della tavola d’acqua

Acque termali, acque corrosive, contaminazione dell’acqua, inondazioni o risalita dell’acqua, alterazioni idrotermali, frane, modificazione del karst e del thermokarst, cambiamenti improvvisi nella pressione idraulica

si

si

 

La Figura 4, ad esempio, mostra l’età e l’ubicazione di fenomeni vulcanici centroeuropei. Per questi siti pertanto quanto raccomandato dalla guida dovrebbe essere svolto. Più in generale, essa dovrebbe essere applicata per tutti i siti che rientrano nei requisiti illustrati nella sua Figura 5.

Fig. 4. Mappa della presenza di attività vulcanica durante l’Olocene (triangoli gialli) in Spagna, Francia e Germania. Si può vedere chiaramente che i siti elettronucleari sono localizzati vicino a queste manifestazioni vulcaniche. 

Fig. 5. Approccio metodologico per la valutazione del rischio vulcanico (modificato da IAEA SSG-21(2012), Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation of Nuclear Installations).


Conclusioni
Come già scritto nell’introduzione, in questa brevissima nota sono state fornite solo le conclusioni più significative in merito alla presenza ed all’entità dei rischi: sismico, vulcanico e da maremoto, nel territorio europeo. Gli stress test degli impianti europei sono stati espletati sulla base dei valori di progetto di questi impianti  calcolati prima dell’incidente catastrofico di Fukushima. Questo incidente ha però comportato a livello mondiale un significativo passo in avanti nella valutazione di questi rischi e quindi nella definizione dei relativi carichi progettuali e ciò è ben rappresentato nei documenti IAEA citati in questa sede. Scopo di questo articolo è quindi solo sottolineare questo aspetto. L’utilizzo di queste Guide tecniche della IAEA assicurerebbe anche una omogeneità nella valutazione di questi rischi a livello europeo e ciò crediamo che non sia un aspetto di poco conto, anche in linea di una effettiva integrazione europea.